How to respond to a debt collector’s request for admissions

January 25, 2011 by Todd Murray · Leave a Comment 

A favorite litigation tactic used by debt collectors is to serve an unsuspecting consumer with requests for admission. These are typically a series of statements that you are asked to admit or deny. In other forms of litigation, admissions are typically used to figure out what facts are disputed in the case. But debt collectors don’t use requests for admission to learn more about what facts you dispute. In fact, they could probably care less about your answers to the admissions and would prefer that you didn’t answer them at all.

284894404_cef7f3e0471Why? Because if you don’t answer the admissions within 30 days, every statement in them is then considered to be true. So debt collectors structure them in a way that if you don’t answer, you’ve admitted each element of their case. And debt collectors are well-aware that the majority of people will not answer the admissions because they don’t understand the serious consequences of not doing so.

This is just another example of debt collectors using a court rule for something other than its intended purpose. I’ve seen debt collectors ask judges to rule in their favor based only on the consumer’s failure to respond to the requests for admission. They didn’t produce any billing statements, applications, terms and conditions–any evidence. And though I suspect that most judges know exactly what the debt collector is up to, their hands are tied to a certain degree by the court rules.

So the lesson here is to respond to every request for admission within 30 days. You only have to admit the statement if you know for a fact that its true. For example, if the statement asks you to admit having a credit card with a specific 16-digit account number, unless you know for sure that is your account number, you can probably deny the request. Of course, if you have copies of your billing statements with that account number on them, you’ll probably have to admit that request.

If you live in Minnesota and want help responding to a debt collector’s discovery requests, feel free to contact me by using the contact form in the upper right corner of this page. I offer a number of flexible representation options, so even if you can only afford to pay a few hundred dollars, I might be able to help you.

(photo: David Micheal Morris)

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About Todd Murray
I'm a consumer rights lawyer in Minneapolis, Minnesota. I sue debt collectors that harass and abuse people, defend debt collection lawsuits, and sue repossession companies that wrongfully repossess cars and trucks.

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I welcome your comments, but please don't post questions about your personal legal problem in this public forum. Rather than posting your question here, I recommend discussing your situation privately with a lawyer of your choice. If you live in Minnesota, feel free to use the contact form in the upper right corner of this page to request an initial consulation with me. To protect your privacy, I will delete all comments that involve a personal legal problem.